To Mouthwash or Not?

Every professional has a different opinion on mouthwash. Some love it, others discourage its use. There are many rumors and myths flying around about mouthwash, so we’ve decided to put a few of them to rest. Read six mouthwash truths below.

Mouthwash cannot take the place of brushing

Mouthwash does help reduce plaque and cavities, but it will never replace proper brushing and flossing. You don’t actually need to use mouthwash, but you do need to brush and floss your teeth.

It can dry out your mouth

If the mouthwash that you use contains alcohol, it has a drying effect on your mouth. This can actually make your bad breath worse. When searching for a good brand of mouthwash to help with bad breath, be sure to avoid mouthwash with alcohol. Look for a brand that contains chlorine dioxide (it kills bad breath causing volatile sulphur compounds).

It does cut down on cavities

A fluoride rinse – like mouthwash – does reduce cavities. Studies have proven it over and over and over again. Using mouthwash will help your oral hygiene, but as stated above, cannot be the only thing that you use. Wait about an hour after brushing your teeth for best results. It also reduces the risk of periodontal disease. Just make sure that you are using mouthwash in conjunction to brushing and flossing and not trying to replace it.

Mouthwashes are not created equal

Not all mouthwashes reduce cavities. Some are made solely to make your mouth taste better and do not contain the necessary ingredients to fight off cavities. There are two types of mouthwashes, cosmetic and therapeutic. Cosmetic is the type explained above, they can loosen food and lessen bacteria, but don’t fight off cavities. Therapeutic mouthwash contains one or more of the of the following: essential oils, chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, or fluoride. These active ingredients do help fight off cavities.

Mouthwash is only temporary

Many people believe that mouthwash will cure them of their bad breath — forever. The truth is that mouthwash is only a temporary fix. It will make your breath smell better for the time being, but if you had garlic in your lunch or you have bad oral hygiene, it will not last forever. That would be like never bathing and using deodorant to hide your smell — you can only do it for so long. Make sure that you brush and floss properly and regularly.

Every professional has a different opinion on mouthwash. Some love it, others discourage its use. There are many rumors and myths flying around about mouthwash, so we’ve decided to put a few of them to rest. Read six mouthwash truths below.

Mouthwash cannot take the place of brushing

Mouthwash does help reduce plaque and cavities, but it will never replace proper brushing and flossing. You don’t actually need to use mouthwash, but you do need to brush and floss your teeth.

It can dry out your mouth

If the mouthwash that you use contains alcohol, it has a drying effect on your mouth. This can actually make your bad breath worse. When searching for a good brand of mouthwash to help with bad breath, be sure to avoid mouthwash with alcohol. Look for a brand that contains chlorine dioxide (it kills bad breath causing volatile sulphur compounds).

It does cut down on cavities

A fluoride rinse – like mouthwash – does reduce cavities. Studies have proven it over and over and over again. Using mouthwash will help your oral hygiene, but as stated above, cannot be the only thing that you use. Wait about an hour after brushing your teeth for best results. It also reduces the risk of periodontal disease. Just make sure that you are using mouthwash in conjunction to brushing and flossing and not trying to replace it.

Mouthwashes are not created equal

Not all mouthwashes reduce cavities. Some are made solely to make your mouth taste better and do not contain the necessary ingredients to fight off cavities. There are two types of mouthwashes, cosmetic and therapeutic. Cosmetic is the type explained above, they can loosen food and lessen bacteria, but don’t fight off cavities. Therapeutic mouthwash contains one or more of theof the following: essential oils, chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, or fluoride. These active ingredients do help fight off cavities.

Mouthwash is only temporary

Many people believe that mouthwash will cure them of their bad breath — forever. The truth is that mouthwash is only a temporary fix. It will make your breath smell better for the time being, but if you had garlic in your lunch or you have bad oral hygiene, it will not last forever. That would be like never bathing and using deodorant to hide your smell — you can only do it for so long. Make sure that you brush and floss properly and regularly.

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