Teeth Milestones

Do you know the major tooth milestones that your child will experience? Read on for a quick guide.

Birth

Teeth begin developing even before your baby is born. They develop tooth buds, or the foundation for baby teeth. Sometimes, babies are born with a tooth, or they develop a tooth within the first few weeks after birth, although this only happens about 1 in 700 births. If your baby is born with natal teeth, there is nothing to worry about, as they are not dangerous.

Four to Twelve Months

During this period teething begins. It will be a painful process for most babies, although not for all. On average, children have their first tooth by six months. For the most part, teeth come through in the following order: the bottom two front teeth, the top front teeth (at about 7 months), and then the other teeth along the sides will come in (starting at about 9-12 months). Tooth development is hereditary, so your baby will probably follow the same trend you did when your teeth grew in.

Twelve to Fifteen Months

During this time your baby’s molars will start to come in. You should take your child to the dentist for his or her first visit. It is also important to brush your child’s teeth every night. You should start with the first tooth. Avoid putting your baby to bed with a bottle, as the sugars can rot their teeth. If your baby’s teeth have not yet come in, you should visit your dentist to make sure that there are no problems.

Sixteen to Twenty-Two Months

Your baby will begin to grow their canine teeth during these months. They will come in after the first molars, so don’t be alarmed when this happens.

Twenty to Thirty-Three Months

The other molars (the second molars) will begin to grow in between 20 and 30 months, but on average, they come in at about 26 months. The will erupt on the bottom first and then shortly after, they will grow in the top. At this age, your child may be able to begin to brush their own teeth. However, they probably won’t do an adequate job, and you will need to help them until they are about six.

Two to Three Years

Your child’s baby teeth will have grown in completely. They will have 20 bright, white, primary teeth.

Four Years

At this age, your child’s facial and jaw bones will grow, allowing space for permanent teeth to come in.

Six to Seven Years

Your child will probably lose their first tooth at about six years old. The adult teeth will start to grow in during this time as well. The teeth tend to fall out in the same order that they came in (lower front teeth, upper front teeth, etc.). Your child should be able to properly brush their teeth on their own at this point in time. Although it is very rare, some children will lose their first tooth even earlier, at age 4. While it is a good idea to wiggle to lose teeth, do not yank them out, as the exposed and broken root may become infected. Your child will also begin to grow six-year-old molars at this time.

Twelve Years

By this time, most, if not all of the baby teeth have fallen out. Your child will also grow their twelve-year-old molars.

Seventeen to Twenty-Five Years

Sometime in this period, the wisdom teeth will start budding. Most people get them removed, because their growth will do more harm than good in your mouth. Wisdom teeth are either impacted (they are too far back in the mouth), growing at the wrong angle, will be too difficult to clean properly, or your mouth just isn’t big enough for them.

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